12- 1-D and 2-D time

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Quantum of 123d space = h

Quantum of energy in gravity > h

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1-D, 2-D, and 3-D time energy

In a 1-D photon, the 1-D electric energy accelerates toward a lower energy level by transferring some of its energy to adjacent 123d space, which reacts by forming opposing 1-D magnetic energy to provide directional balance to the 1-D electric energy. 

As 123d space produces the 1-D magnetic energy, it simultaneously forms an equal and opposing 1-D time energy at 180 degrees to the 1-D magnetic vector to provide directional balance to its "sister" magnetic energy, thereby maintaining the directional balance of 123d space.  The 1-D time energy immediately dissipates back into 123d space as it forms, once again becoming basic 1-D units of 123d space in random motion and distribution. The dissipation of 1-D time energy allows its "sister" 1-D magnetic energy to provide maximum directional balance to the 1-D electric energy. It also results in the undirectional path of the photon.

The 1-D magnetic energy accepts energy from the 1-D electric energy until it reaches its maximum energy level - the inherent magnitude of 1-D energy of 123d space, equal to one quantum, or “h” amount of energy (Planck’s constant).  Unlike its “sister” 1-D magnetic energy, 1-D time energy does not accumulate one quantum of energy by moving to its highest possible energy level - the inherent magnitude of 1-D energy of 123d space. Instead, it immediately dissipates back into 123d space as it forms. A total of one quantum of 1-D time energy per electromagnetic interaction is formed and dissipated with each electromagnetic interaction of a photon.

In a 2-D electromagnetic energy system (e.g., an electron), the process is essentially the same, except that the system is composed of 2-D electric energy moving toward a lower energy level by transferring its energy to adjacent 123d space, which reacts by forming 2-D magnetic energy perpendicular to the 2-D electric energy.  As the 2-D magnetic energy forms, 123d space also produces 2-D time energy to oppose the unidirectional magnetic energy at 180 degrees to maintain the directional balance of 123d space.  The 2-D time energy immediately dissipates back into 123d space as it forms, once again becoming basic 1-D units of 123d space in random motion and distribution relative to each other.

In a 2-D electromagnetic interaction, 2-D electric energy moves toward a lower energy level by filling the space of a 2-D plane. As it does, 2-D magnetic energy forms perpendicular to it, and 2-D time energy forms at 180 degrees and immediately dissipates, resulting in a undirectional motion of the 2-D electromagnetic energy (e-m) system, such as an electron or a positron. Since the 2-D e-m system is confined to a particle, this unidirectional motion takes the form of a system spin, and due to its gravitational energy gradient, this spin results in system angular momentum.

In a 3-D electromagnetic energy system, such as a proton, the electromagnetic process is more complex since the proton is composed of constituent 2-D particles. Each proton consists of three quarks that result in one unit charge. In this model, quarks are electron-positron particles with alternating (or oscillating) electromagnetic (e-m) directionality. This means that each particle changes e-m directionality with every e-m interaction, so that a particle changes structure from an electron to a positron - or vice versa - with every e-m interaction. An electron-positron particle is designated e-+/e+- to show that it alternates directionality with each e-m interaction. Most of these particles are entangled with directionally opposing particles, and are discussed further in the sections on entanglement.

Although a 3-D e-m energy system consists of constituent particles, its total electric energy may oscillate in electromagnetic interactions in three dimensions. If it does, the 3-D e-m interactions would be similar to those of 2-D e-m energy systems, but the 3-D electric energy would move away from or toward system center filling a 3-D volume (as opposed to a 2-D plane). As 3-D magnetic energy forms, opposing 3-D time energy would form at 180 degrees to provide directional balance, and dissipate immediately back into 123d space as it forms. As in the case of a 2-D e-m energy system, the dissipating 3-D time energy results in a unidirectional system motion, or system spin. This system spin results in angular momentum due to the gravitational energy gradient of the 3-D e-m energy system.

 

See illustration below. Click here for enlargement.

12- 1-D and 2-D time

 

 

To explore traditional views on time, see "Time" on Wikipedia.