32- attraction and repulsion of energy

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Attraction and repulsion of energy

All unidirectional energy is electromagnetic in nature.  Entanglement provides optimal directional balance when two identical e-m energy systems (e.g., 2-D e-+/e+- and 2-D e+-/e-+ particles) possess opposing and alternating e-m directionality and interchanging identities with every e-m interaction.

There are other interactions that will result in varying degrees of directional balance, including unidirectional particles, such as....

....a charged particle (e.g., unidrectional energy, such as an unentangled electron or a proton) that is directionally balanced by the magnetic and gravitational energy of 123d space,

....entangled particles with different rates of e-m interaction, resulting in partial entanglement, and partial directional balance,

....an entangled particle within an atom - especially in an outer orbital - that is entangled with a particle of another atom that exists at a higher or lower energy level (for example, in water molecules, and in molecules that ionize in water, such as Na+Cl-),

....when one element of a molecule has an outer subshell (i.e., s, p, d, or f) configuration that has an odd number of orbital particles, resulting in an imbalanced orbital or orbitals due to no entangled orbital partner(s) in that orbital subshell,

....when an even number of orbital particles consisting of 4, 8, or 12 (i.e., numbers that do not constitute a "filled" subshell) occupy the outer subshell, causing partial directional imbalance due to two pairs of adjacent orbital particles with the same e-m directionality per e-m interaction (in three dimensional space, these "like" adjacent orbital particles will stay a maximum distance from each other, but will nevertheless result in an orbital structure with partial directional imbalance),

....an orbital particle that is not entangled with another orbital particle, but instead entangled only with a nuclear particle existing at a corresponding orbital within the nucleus (e.g., when an element has an outer subshell with only one orbital particle - with no entangled orbital partner),

....electrically neutral “mass” that is directionally balanced by gravitational energy gradients formed by the energy of 123d space.

Attraction of unidirectional or electromagnetic energy will occur whenever the union of two energy systems provides greater directional balance.  For example, attraction occurs when two identical particles with opposing e-m directionality become entangled, resulting in alternating e-m directionality and interchanging identities with every e-m interaction, providing optimal directional balance.

Repulsion of unidirectional or electromagnetic energy will occur whenever the union of two energy systems provides greater unidirectionality, or directional imbalance.  For example, repulsion occurs when two identical particles with the same e-m directionality (e.g., two electrons) approach each other, resulting in greater unidirectionality, or when two particles, not entangled with each other, with out-of-phase alternating e-m directionality (same e-m directionality with each e-m interaction) approach each other.

The relative strength of attraction or repulsion depends upon the differential between the energy system's (e.g., particle, body of mass, magnet) initial energy level and the energy level to which it can move. For instance, a very strong magnetic north pole can combine with a very strong magnetic south pole, moving from a high energy level to a much lower energy level. This results in a strong attraction due to the difference between initial and final energy levels. The same is true for repulsion. If a very strong magnetic north pole is exposed to a similarly strong north pole, the two will stongly repel each other because if they approached each other, their final energy level would be much higher than their initial energy levels. All energies, if left alone, will move toward a lower energy level.

If undirectional energy, such as a charged particle, can interact with other unidirectional energy to become a directionally balanced energy system, it will spontaneously move to this lower energy level. The difference between its initial high energy level and the lower energy level to which it moves governs the strength of the "attractive force."

NOTE: In electrically neutral atoms, each orbital particle is entangled with a nucleon existing at a corresponding energy level (or orbital) within the nucleus. When the orbital consists of two particles, they are entangled with each other, and each of them is entangled with a nucleon existing at the corresponding orbital within the nucleus. This entanglement of a pair of entangled orbital-nucleon particles represents a structure with optimal directional balance (by itself, this is the structure of a Helium atom). Such a structure is least likely to possess any attraction or repulsion due to directional imbalance.

See illustration below. Click here for enlargement.

 

32- attraction-repulsion of energy

 

To explore traditional views on the forces between magnets, see "Force between magnets" on Wikipedia.