38- gravitational energy gradient

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Charge due to vibrating gravitational gradient of an elementary e-m particle

Relationship of gravitational energy gradient to electromagnetic energy

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Gravitational energy gradient

123d space consists of basic 1-D units of energy in constant random motion and distribution relative to each other.

The total energy of each basic 1-D unit of 123d space consists of potential and kinetic energy, and is constant.  The “potential” energy of 123d space is composed of the energy contained within each basic 1-D unit of energy, and therefore the number of basic 1-D units of energy per unit area or unit volume (i.e., the density of 123d space).  The “kinetic” energy of 123d space consists of the rate of motion of basic 1-D units of energy relative to each other (possibly affected by the degree of their randomness and distribution - or degree of directional balance). The amount of potential energy and kinetic energy of 123d space in conjunction with the degree of randomness results in optimum directional balance of the energy of 123d space, creating an energy system in dynamic equilibrium.

123d space responds to the energy differential between a body of “mass” (2-D or 3-D e-m energy system) and 123d space by forming a directionally opposing gravitational energy gradient by:

1)  increasing the proportion of its “potential” energy (number of basic 1-D units of 123d space per unit area or unit volume) inward toward the body of mass, and

2)  proportionally decreasing the amount of its “kinetic” energy (rate of motion of basic 1-D units of 123d space relative to each other) inward toward the body of mass.

The basic 1-D units of energy compose the fabric of 123d space.  Near a body of mass, where there is a large proportion of “potential” energy of 123d space, the fabric of space is “thick” and lethargic (i.e., high energy density of 123d space).  The gravitational energy gradient results in slower rates of electromagnetic interaction, or slower rates of time, nearer and nearer to the body of mass*.  The inherent energy magnitude and directional balance of 123d space is maintained in the process.

Any 2-D or 3-D energy system consists of “mass” since it possesses a gravitational energy gradient (formed by the energy of surrounding 123d space).  1-D electromagnetic energy systems cannot possess “mass” because the basic 1-D units of 123d space form a gravitational energy gradient in 2-D or 3-D space.  It is not possible to form such a gradient in 1-D space.  However, perhaps v = c is the 1-D equivalent of a gravitational energy gradient or perhaps equivalent to a center of gravity.

The gravitational gradient of a body of mass, including elementary particles, is equal to the total energy of the body of mass for which it provides directional balance. This means that a gravitational gradient is finite. It does not extend indefinitely. In the case of elementary electromagnetic (e-m) particles, such as electrons and positrons, their gravitational gradients oscillate or vibrate with every electromagnetic interaction, composing a "charge" field with opposing directionality to that of the e-m directionality of the particle. In other words, the vibrating gravitational gradient is the charge field, so both gravitational gradient and charge extend the same distance outward from the particle, and are limited to the amount of energy that the e-m particle possesses. (However, unlike a linear 1-D photon that does not possess a gravitational gradient, when the energy or mass of a 2-D or 3-D elementary e-m particle increases, the strength of its gravitational energy gradient increases, and its frequency of e-m interactions decreases. This maintains the magnitude of unit charge across all sizes of 2-D and 3-D elementary e-m particles.)

The properties of gravitational energy gradients change near absolute zero (0 Kelvin, 0 K), and also near the upper temperature limit (unknown). As temperature approaches absolute zero, the surrounding inherent energy of 123d space will consist primarily of potential energy. Because the inherent energy of 123d space possesses very little kinetic energy near absolute zero, it cannot form a strong gravitational energy gradient consisting of less kinetic energy of 123d space and proportionally more potential energy of 123d space nearer and nearer to the body of mass (i.e., 2-D or 3-D e-m energy). With the inherent energy consisting primarily of potential energy near absolute zero, only a very weak gravitational gradient can be formed.

Conversely, near the upper temperature limit, the inherent energy of 123d space consists of primarily kinetic energy with very little potential energy, and again, only a very weak gravitational energy gradient can be formed. In both cases, the behavior of subatomic and atomic particles will be significantly different than at "intermediate" temperatures.

So what happens near absolute zero? If there is a very weak gravitational gradient with 123d space consisting of predominantly potential energy (i.e., its basic bidirectional 1-D units of energy - in very slow motion relative to each other), the rate of e-m interaction, and rate of time, should be very slow as well. However, this does not necessarily predict the resulting behavior of subatomic and atomic particles, since in some cases, a much weaker gravitational energy gradient and slower rate of e-m interaction may remove barriers to certain physical or chemical interactions.

 

See illustration below. Click here for enlargement.

38- gravitational energy gradient

To explore traditional views on gravitational energy, see "Gravitation" on Wikipedia.