41bA - relationship of gravitational energy gradient to e-m energy - 4-27-14

Illustration 1. Relationship between gravitational gradient and e-m energy.

41c- strength of gravitational gradients and electromagnetic energy - 4-27-14

Illustration 2. Strength of gravitational gradient and e-m energy.

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Relationship of gravitational energy gradient to electromagnetic energy

The inherent energy of 123d space consists of basic units of 1-D bidirectional energy in random motion and distribution relative to each other to maintain a dynamic equilibrium or directional balance of the energy system.  The basic units of 1-D energy represent the potential energy of 123d space, while the rate of motion of the 1-D units of energy constitutes the kinetic energy of 123d space.

When some energy of 123d space becomes nonrandom, it creates a directional imbalance, and the adjacent inherent energy of 123d space reacts to provide directional balance.  For instance, when a region consists of a greater proportion of kinetic energy than that of the inherent energy of 123d space, the adjacent energy of 123d space will directionally oppose that energy with a proportionally greater amount of potential energy of 123d space to provide directional balance.

In the case of a 2-D electromagnetic (e-m) particle, such as an electron or a positron, the inherent energy of 123d space forms a gravitational energy gradient about the particle.  The gravitational gradient provides directional balance to the particle with directionally opposing energy composed of a changing ratio of potential to kinetic energy of 123d space inward toward the center of gravity.  The amount of potential energy increases inward toward the body of mass, and the amount of kinetic energy decreases proportionally to maintain the directional balance of the inherent energy of 123d space.  The gravitational gradient possesses an equal amount of total energy to that of the particle (or body of mass) for which it is providing directional balance.

A gravitational energy gradient provides directional balance to an electron, while an inverted or anti-gravitational energy gradient provides directional balance to a positron.  The 2-D electron is composed of electromagnetic energy that moves outward from system center, and recycles through a 1-D axis of spin inward to system center.  Its gravitational gradient possesses a changing ratio of greater and greater potential to kinetic energy of 123d space inward toward the center of gravity.  Since the 2-D e-m energy of the electron is in motion relative to system center, its gravitational gradient is stronger than that for an “electrically neutral” body of mass.  In addition, its gravitational gradient oscillates or vibrates with every e-m interaction of the electron, resulting in a directional force surrounding the electron.  The directional force caused by the vibrating gravitational energy gradient composes the “charge field” of the electron.

The 2-D positron is composed of electromagnetic energy that moves inward to system center, and recycles through a 1-D axis of spin outward to the polar surfaces.  Its gravitational gradient possesses a changing ratio of greater and greater kinetic to potential energy of 123d space inward toward the center of gravity.  The gravitational gradient of a positron oscillates or vibrates with every e-m interaction, resulting in a directional force opposite that of an electron.  The directional force caused by the vibrating gravitational energy gradient composes the “charge field” of the positron.

So a 2-D elementary e-m particle possesses a strong gravitational energy gradient that is formed by the inherent energy of 123d space to provide directional balance.  What if the 2-D e-m particle, such as a positron, is capable of “vibrating” from position to position within its gravitational energy gradient, with the center of gravity making adjustments with each e-m interaction?  (This possibility is covered in the sections, "Particle jumping out of its gravitational gradient" and "Vacant gravitational gradients form new particles.")  If the positron is able to occupy various positions within its gravitational gradient with every e-m interaction, the probability of its position being near the center of gravity would be highest, while the probability of its position being near the outer boundary of its gravitational gradient would be lowest. 

It may be possible that the 2-D e-m positron “jumps” out of its gravitational gradient, leaving it vacant.  When this happens, a new gravitational gradient will immediately form about the escaped particle.  The “empty” gravitational gradient will now possess unidirectional or unbalanced energy, and it will immediately react to regain its directional balance.  The predominantly potential energy at its outer boundary collapses inward toward the predominantly kinetic energy at system center, and the kinetic energy at system center moves outward toward the potential energy, the two energies turn perpendicular to each other to provide maximum opposing force for optimal directional balance.  When the perpendicular 2-D planes of energy “meet” each other, they form an electromagnetic energy system – a new 2-D e-m particle with opposing e-m directionality to that of its escaped particle – in this case, a 2-D electron is formed.  The predominantly potential energy constitutes the 2-D magnetic energy, while the predominantly kinetic energy composes the 2-D electric energy of the electron.

So now the relationship between a gravitational energy gradient and an elementary electromagnetic energy system can be understood in terms of the inherent energy of 123d space.  The gravitational energy gradient consists of a changing ratio of potential to kinetic energy of 123d space inward toward a body of mass (i.e., 2-D or 3-D e-m energy), and an elementary 2-D electromagnetic energy system consists of two 2-D planes of energy – a 2-D plane of predominately electric energy perpendicular to a 2-D plane of predominantly magnetic energy.

When the body of mass consists of energy moving relative to its system center, such as that of a 2-D positron or a 2-D electron, then the gravitational gradient must be stronger than that for an “electrically neutral” body of mass.  The strength of a gravitational energy gradient is partially determined by the proportion of potential to kinetic energy at its outer boundary relative to the proportion of potential to kinetic energy at system center.

Let’s assume that the inherent energy of 123d space consists of a 50:50 ratio of potential to kinetic energy.  If the outer boundary of a gravitational gradient of a 2-D electron consists of a 20:80 ratio of potential to kinetic energy and a 80:20 ratio of potential energy of potential to kinetic energy at system center, this might represent a moderately strong gravitational gradient.  On the other hand, if the outer boundary of a gravitational gradient consists of a 05:95 ratio of potential to kinetic energy and a 95:05 ratio of potential to kinetic energy at system center, this might represent a very strong gravitational gradient.  In the second case, the electron would possess a slower rate of e-m interaction, and a proportionally slower rate of time, and proportionally more inertia than in the first case.

Now let’s consider the energy of a 2-D e-m electron.  If the 2-D plane of magnetic energy consists of a 80:20 ratio of potential to kinetic energy, and the 2-D plane of electric energy consists of an 20:80 ratio of potential to kinetic energy, this might represent a moderately energetic 2-D e-m electron.  In other words, the electron might possess a moderate amount of kinetic energy.  On the other hand, if the electron’s 2-D plane of magnetic energy consists of a 95:05 ratio of potential to kinetic energy, and its 2-D plane of electric energy consists of a 05:95 ratio of potential to kinetic energy, this might represent a very energy 2-D e-m electron, or an electron with a high amount of kinetic energy.

So, both the gravitational energy gradient and electromagnetic energy consist of varying ratios of potential to kinetic energy of 123d space.  In the case of the gravitational energy gradient, the energy responds with opposing directionality to that of the e-m energy system to provide directional balance.  The gravitational energy does not provide opposing directionality through motion relative to system center, but through a changing ratio of potential to kinetic energy of 123d space inward toward system center.  (The gravitational energy gradient can oscillate or vibrate, however, with the e-m interactions of its elementary particle, resulting in a directional force field, or a “charge” field.)
On the other hand, an elementary 2-D electromagnetic particle, such as an electron or a positron, consists of two perpendicular 2-D planes of energy – 2-D magnetic energy (composed of predominantly potential energy of 123d space) and 2-D electric energy (composed of predominantly kinetic energy of 123d space) – in motion relative to system center.  The two energy systems oscillate with the 2-D electric energy moving toward a lower energy level, forcing the 2-D magnetic energy to move toward a higher energy level, and then the 2-D magnetic energy moving toward a lower energy level, forcing the 2-D electric energy to move back to a higher energy level.  This process repeats over and over again in what is known as electromagnetic interactions.  In the case of 2-D and 3-D electromagnetic interactions, the inherent energy of 123d space forms gravitational energy gradients about the particles to provide directional balance.  (In the case of 1-D electromagnetic photons, the formation of gravitational gradients is not possible, and the electromagnetic energy proceeds at a right angle to the e-m interactions at v = c as a result.) 

 

See illustration below. Click here for enlargement.

41b- relationship between gravitational and electomagnetic energy - 4-27-14

  

 

To explore traditional views on gravitational energy, see "Gravitation" on Wikipedia.