53- neutron structure

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Neutron decay

Atomic energy system

Entanglement in an atom

Nucleon mass size due to entanglement and gravitational gradient strength

Developing an equation - to describe nucleon size due to gravitational gradient and entanglement

Effect of temperature limits on atomic particle mass size

Photon interacts with orbital e-+/ e+- particle

Atomic nucleus - 3-D unidirectional energy component

Isotopes

Bosons versus fermions

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Neutron structure

Neutrons consist of a proton core with an external electron-positron (e-+/e+-) particle revolving in close proximity about the boundary of the proton structure - entangled with the positron-electron (e+-/e-+) particle existing at the center of the proton (i.e., this particle would otherwise be a positron producing the positive charge of the proton).

The external revolving e-+/e+- particle has a relatively large mass size because it exists in a region of strong gravitational energy gradient compared to that of allowed orbitals of a hydrogen atom. This results in a relatively slow rate of e-m interaction for the external revolving e-+/e+- particle so that it may not form a strong entanglement with its partner existing within the boundaries of the proton. While the external particle possesses a faster rate of e-m interaction than that of its entangled partner at the center of the proton, it does not possess a fast enough rate of e-m interaction (i.e., enough energy) to "bump" its entangled partner inside the proton to a corresponding energy level so that both entangled particles possess the same rate of e-m interaction.

If the external e-+/e+- particle existed in an "allowed" atomic orbital (as in the case of a Hydrogen atom), then it would be a relatively great distance from the proton in a region of weak gravitational gradient, with a faster rate of e-m interaction, and a faster rate of time. The orbital particle would then have a high rate of e-m interaction with enough energy to “bump” its entangled particle in the nucleus to a higher corresponding energy level so that the entangled nuclear particle takes on the same higher rate of e-m interaction as its orbital partner, forming a strong entanglement.

Instead, the external e-+/e+- particle revolving about the outer boundary of the proton possesses a different rate of e-m interaction than that of its entangled e+-/e-+ particle within the proton, resulting in “partial” or weak entanglement. For example, for every 3 e-m interactions of the external revolving e-+/e+- particle, its entangled e+-/e-+ partner at system center may undergo only 1 e-m interaction.  This means that the two particles are only entangled once out of every 3 e-m interactions.

In summary, the above entangled relationship between an external e-+/e+- particle revolving in close proximity of the proton boundary and its nuclear (i.e., within the proton) partner is considerably different than for an orbital e-+/e+- particle entangled with a nuclear e+-/e-+ particle. In the first case, the two entangled particles exist in different regions, but the strength of the gravitational energy gradient in which each resides is not dramatically different compared to the latter case in which the orbital particle exists at a relatively great distance from the nucleus in a much weaker gravitational energy gradient with a significantly faster rate of e-m interaction and faster rate of time (see Nucleon Size Due to Entanglement). So the entangled relationship between the external e-+/e+- particle revolving in close proximity to the proton boundary forms a weak entanglement with its e+-/e-+ partner within the proton, resulting in the relatively unstable structure of the neutron.

See illustration below. Click here for enlargement.

 

53- neutron structure

 

To explore traditional views on properties of neutrons, see "Neutron" on Wikipedia.