56b - how absolute temperature limits affect atomic particle mass size - 12-11-12

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Effect of temperature limits on atomic particle mass size

When temperature is near abolute zero (-273 C or 0 K), the energy of 123d space is nearly 100% potential energy. This means that there is very little kinetic energy of 123d space to form a ratio of potential to kinetic energy inward toward a body of mass. In other words, only very weak gravitational gradients can be formed by the energy of 123d space at temperatures near absolute zero. As a result, particles will be very small in terms of mass size (where mass is defined as kinetic energy confined by a gravitational energy gradient in the form of potential energy).

When temperature is near absolute hot (unknown quantity), the energy of 123d space is nearly 100% kinetic energy. This means that there is very little potential energy of 123d space to form a ratio of potential to kinetic energy inward toward a body of mass. As a result, only very weak gravitational gradients can be formed by the energy of 123d space at temperatures near absolute hot. At these extremely high temperatures, particles will be very small in terms of mass size.

Within an atom, at temperatures near absolute zero or absolute hot, both orbital and nuclear particles will be about the same mass size .... possessing very small mass size. As temperatures move away from absolute zero or absolute hot, strengthening gravitational gradients may form, permitting atomic orbital particles to exist in regions of weaker gravitational energy gradient than their entangled nuclear counterparts that now exist within the stronger gravitational gradient of the nucleus.

As temperatures moderate even further, the atomic nuclear particles exist within a stronger and stronger gravitational gradient than their entangled orbital partners. The nuclear particles possess the same high rate of e-m interaction as their entangled orbital partners to achieve optimal directional balance, but because they exist in a much stronger gravitational gradient with a slower rate of e-m interaction and rate of time (time dilation), the nucleons possess much more energy or mass size than their orbital partners.

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56b - Temperature limits effect on nucleon size - 2-18-13

To explore traditional views on temperature limits, see "Absolute Zero" on Wikipedia.