58- atomic nucleus with 3-D unidirectional energy component

Links:

Isotopes

Bosons versus fermions

Home

Atomic nucleus - 3-D unidirectional energy component

The atomic nucleus consists of two energy systems existing in the same space at the same time.  The two energy systems are different manifestations of the same energy, made possible by the entangled relationships of orbital and nuclear particles existing in a state of optimal directional balance, essentially without individual identities. 

One of the energy systems consists of e+-/e-+ particles that exist at various energy levels within the nucleus and within relatively distant orbitals. Orbital and nuclear e+-/e-+ particles are entangled with e-+/e+- partners existing at corresponding energy levels. The entangled partners provide optimal directional balance to each other through opposing, alternating e-m directionality and interchanging identities with every e-m interaction. The orbital particles exist in regions of weak gravitational energy gradient with a fast rate of e-m interaction and a fast rate of time. As a result, the orbital particles possess enough energy to "bump" their entangled nuclear partners to a corresponding energy level within the nucleus, so that both orbital and nuclear entangled partners possess the same rate of e-m interaction, providing optimal directional balance to each other, resulting in a strong entanglement.

In the other energy system, the nuclear 3-D unidirectional, or electric, energy represents the energy of the nuclear e+-/e-+ particles (and possibly the entangled orbital e-+/e+- partners?) existing in a state of optimal directional balance, essentially without individual identities. The 3-D undirectional energy moves (accelerates) outward from system center toward a lower energy level by transferring some of its energy to the entangled orbital e-+/e+- particles, which form an opposing magnetic energy perpendicular to the electric energy. The magnetic energy forms a spherical "shell" as it moves outward to a higher energy level.  When the magnetic energy reaches its maximum energy magnitude - the magnitude of magnetic provided by 123d space to the orbital particles - the magnetic component can take on no more energy, and returns its newly acquired energy to the electric energy, forcing it to return to its original higher energy level at system center.  The electric energy returns (decelerates) to system center along the 1-D axis of spin as 1-D energy. The strong gravitational energy gradient has little or no impact on 1-D energy.

Within a large atom, the 3-D unidectional energy may be "confined" at multiple energy levels dictated by the combined energy magnitude of the corresponding orbital e-+/e+- particles that provide the directionally balancing magnetic energy at a given energy level. For example, if 8 orbital e-+/e+- particles exist within the same energy level, each will be entangled with an orbital partner, and the 4 pairs of entangled particles will also be entangled. The 8 orbital e-+/e+- particles exist in a wavefunction in a state of superposition - they exist in a state of optimal directional balance and do not possess defined individual identities, their total energy acting as "one."

The total energy of the 8 orbital e-+/e+- particles provide 8 quanta of magnetic energy per e-m interaction with the nuclear 3-D unidirectional energy moving outward toward a lower energy level. When the magnetic energy reaches the magnitude of the entangled orbital particles in that energy level (8 quanta), it can provide no more energy, and returns its newly acquired energy to the nuclear 3-D electric energy, forcing it to return to its higher energy level at system center. The 3-D electric energy returns to system center along the 1-D axis of spin. The cycle then repeats itself.

The orbital e-+/e+- particles exist at significant distances from the atomic nucleus at energy levels corresponding to those of their entangled nuclear e+-/e-+ partners.  The nuclear e+-/e-+ particles exist within a strong gravitational energy gradient with a slower (dilated) rate of e-m interaction, and slower rate of time. The nuclear particles and their entangled orbital partners possess the same rate of e-m interaction with every e-m interaction to provide optimal directional balance, allowing them to exist in a strong entangled relationship.  The nuclear e+-/e-+ particles take on the higher rate of e-m interactions of their entangled orbital e-+/e+- partners that exist in a region of much weaker gravitational energy gradient. This results in each nuclear particle possessing large amounts of energy - each nucleon being at least the size of a proton, and usually the size of two protons.

In this model, there are no neutrons in the nucleus. The further out an orbital e-+/e+- particle, the weaker the gravitational gradient, the faster the rate of e-m interactions (i.e., the faster the rate of time), the higher its energy level, and the larger its entangled nuclear partner will be. This means that some nucleons (i.e., e+-/e-+ particles) will be the size of a traditional proton while others may be larger than a proton and neutron combined (in very large nuclei).

Note: All atoms, with the exception of ions, possess an even number of fermions (i.e., entangled orbital e-+/e+- and nuclear e+-/e-+ partners), so all atoms are compound bosons.

Another possibility: The nuclei are created in an exotic environment, such as at the core of a star. The constituent particles of the nucleus are inherently large as a result, and dictate the rate of e-m interaction of their orbital partners, forcing them to exist at corresponding energy levels in distant orbitals in a much weaker gravitational energy gradient in order to provide adequate directional balance to the atomic energy system.

 

See illustration below. Click here for enlargement.

 

58- atomic nucleus 3-D unidirectional energy

 

To explore traditional views on properties of the atomic nucleus, see "Atomic nucleus" on Wikipedia.