59- isotopes

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Isotopes

The total energy within the nucleus may be affected by a number of variables, including....

....entanglement of orbital e-+/e+- particles with nuclear e+-/e-+ particles existing at corresponding energy levels,

....entanglement of orbital e-+/e+- particles with nuclear e+-/e-+ partners existing at different energy levels - resulting in weaker entanglement,

....entanglement between nuclear e+-/e-+ particles existing at the same energy levels within the nucleus,

....entanglement between nuclear e+-/e-+ particles existing at different energy levels within the nucleus - resulting in weaker entanglement,

....entanglement between pairs of entangled nuclear e+-/e-+ particles existing at the same energy level (or at different energy levels - in weaker entangled relationships),

....disentanglement of any of the above,

....changes in the strength of the gravitational energy gradient in the region of the orbital e-+/e+- particles and/or within the nucleus (due to changes in relationships of entangled energy within the nucleus),

....an orbital e+-/e-+ particle changing energy levels (or moving to a region with weaker gravitational energy gradient with a higher rate of e-m interaction and rate of time), changing its rate of e-m interaction, which in turn may change the rate of e-m interaction of its nuclear energy partner,

....when there is an adjustment between an energy level of the distant orbitals with its corresponding energy level within the nucleus to create a more stable structure, emitting nuclear energy in the process, or

...when an orbital e-+/e+- particle becomes disentangled from its nuclear e+-/e-+ partner that is not entangled with a nuclear e-+/e+- partner, lowering its rate of e-m interaction and therefore its total energy. (However, the nuclear e-+/e+- particle may then become entangled with a partner in the nucleus existing at a corresponding energy level to maintain its directional balance, and as a result, it can maintain its total energy - due to its high rate of e-m interaction in a strong gravitational energy gradient).

...the amount of "binding energy" of an entanglement that may be released when partners become disentangled, or absorbed when they become entangled.

Any of the above conditions, among others, may contribute to the formation of an isotope of an element by changing the total energy within a nucleus.

 

See illustration below. Click here for enlargement.

 

59- isotopes

 

To explore traditional views on properties of isotopes, see "Isotope" on Wikipedia.