7- dimensionality

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Displacement order of 123d space

Electromagnetic energy

Photons

Intro to time

1-D, 2-D, 3-D time energy

Quantum of 123d space = h

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Dimensionality

The energy of space is not electromagnetic in nature.  Instead it is composed of basic 1-D bidirectional units of energy in constant random motion and distribution relative to each other, creating a directionally balanced energy system in dynamic equilibrium. Distance or space is produced through sequential events as the basic 1-D units of 123d space interchange identities to maintain maximum randomness and therefore optimum directional balance of 123d space. These basic 1-D units compose 1-D, 2-D, and 3-D space as they cross each others’ paths. The basic 1-D units of 123d space must undergo change through sequential events in order to move the dynamic equilibrium energy system toward greater randomness. (In a static energy system, nonrandomness would be dominant, and this would represent a high, directionally unbalanced energy state that will "want" to move toward a lower energy state.) Each dimension of space possesses distinct properties, so space will be referred to as 123d space in recognition of this.

In our universe of electromagnetic energy, the inherent energy of 123d space produces 1-D, 2-D, and 3-D energy to provide directional balance to nonrandom, or unidirectional energy, or electric energy.  123d space produces 1-D magnetic and 1-D time energies to provide directional balance to the 1-D electric energy of a photon.  As a 1-D electric energy vector (i.e., equivalent to one-half of a basic 1-D unit of 123d space) moves outward from its point of origin (its highest energy level) toward a lower energy level by transferring some of its energy to 123d space, 123d space reacts by forming an opposing 1-D magnetic energy vector with that energy to provide directional balance to the 1-D electric energy.  When the 1-D magnetic energy reaches its highest possible energy level - the inherent energy magnitude of 1-D space, it can proceed no further, and returns its newly acquired energy to the 1-D electric energy, forcing it to return to its original higher energy level.  The two 1-D energies continually move in opposing directions, perpendicular to each other, exchanging high and low energy levels through 1-D electromagnetic interactions.

As the 1-D magnetic energy forms to provide directional balance to the 1-D electric energy, an equal and directionally opposing 1-D time energy forms at 180 degrees to maintain the directional balance of 123d space. However, the 1-D time energy immediately dissipates back into 123d space as random energy as it forms. In this manner, the 1-D time energy provides directional balance to its "sister" 1-D magnetic energy without affecting its ability to provide directional balance to the 1-D electric energy.

In the case of 2-D and 3-D unidirectional, or electric, energy, the non-electromagnetic energy of 123d space sees or experiences the unidirectional energy in motion relative to its system center (i.e., the point of its highest energy level) as the electric energy moves toward a lower energy level by transferring some of its energy to 123d space. The energy of 123dspace responds by forming opposing 2-D or 3-D magnetic energy to provide directional balance, resulting in 2-D or 3-D electromagnetic interactions.

However, in the case of 2-D and 3-D unidirectional energy systems, the magnetic energy alone is not sufficient to provide directional balance to the unidirectional energy. In addition, the energy of 123dspace forms a gravitational energy gradient to provide directional balance to the 2-D or 3-D unidirectional energy system. The gravitational energy gradient is formed by a varying ratio of potential energy of 123d space to kinetic energy of 123d space inward toward the system center. Note that the gravitational energy gradient is not electromagnetic. Instead, all of its energy is composed of the inherent energy of 123d space. (However, the gravitational gradient of elementary particles may oscillate with their electromagnetic interactions, and it may be the resultant vibrating gravitational gradient that constitutes the charge field.)

An elementary 2-D energy system, such as an electron or a positron, consists of electric energy that flows inward to or outward from system center along a 2-D plane. Since the electric energy fills 2-D space outward from system center, it quickly loses density as it moves outward. This is different than the electric energy of a 1-D photon that loses density at a much slower rate as it moves outward along a 1-D vector. In addition, the rate of acceleration for 1-D electric energy is higher than that for 2-D electric energy that spreads out along a 2-D plane from its point of origin as it moves toward a lower energy level.

An elementary 3-D energy system, such as a proton, is somewhat more complex in structure since it consists of constituent particles - quarks or electron-positron/positron-electron particles. However, its electric energy moves inward to or outward from system center, filling a 3-D volume. As a result, the electric energy of a 3-D particle loses density outward from system center at a greater rate than that of a 2-D particle, and at an even faster rate than that of a 1-D photon. In addition, its 3-D electric energy accelerates slower than 2-D electric energy, and much slower than 1-D electric energy as it moves toward a lower energy level from its point of origin.

Is the Compton wavelength valid across 1-D, 2-D, and 3-D? This is unlikely unless there is some inherent geometric proportionality across the three dimensions (and this possibility cannot be excluded). Otherwise, the rate of electromagnetic interaction (all conditions being the same) for elementary energy in each of the three dimensions will be different from each other due to their geometric properties.

In summary, the properties of 1-D, 2-D, and 3-D elementary energy are different. For example, rates of electromagnetic interaction are probably different due to a combination of their respective dimensionalities and gravitational energy gradients. For instance, 2-D energy oscillates back and forth from system center in a 2-D plane or area while 3-D energy oscillates back and forth from system center in a 3-D spherical volume. The 2-D gravitational gradient is due to the changing ratio of potential energy to kinetic energy of 123d space in a 2-D plane inward toward system center while a 3-D gravitational gradient is due to the changing ratio of potential energy to kinetic energy of 123d space in a 3-D spherical volume inward toward system center. As a result of these factors, the Compton wavelength (1-D photon equivalent) does not necessarily apply to 2-D electrons or positrons or to 3-D protons or nucleons.

 

See illustration below. Click here for enlargement.

 

7 - dimensionality

 

 

To explore traditional views on dimensionality, see "Dimension" on Wikipedia.